week five

Monday, December 13th, 2010

The British director Edgar Wright and his films are great examples of auteur theory as described by Andrew Sarris. He has a distinctive energetic and fast paced style in the way he directs, and his films always have a solid combination of action and comedy. As an example, we can compare his 2004 film Shaun Of The Dead, a movie about zombies attacking Great Britain, with his 2007 film Hot Fuzz, a movie about British cops. While both films have very different subject matter and storylines, both films are prime examples of Edgar Wright being an auteur under Sarris’s theory. They both acknowledge the idea of casting a director for certain types of films, which is the first premise of auteur theory, although in Wright’s case he happened to have a hand in writing both films, so he was obviously the ideal director for both of them. Both films also fall under the second premise, that a director must have a signature style. Wright’s films have a very fast paced and energetic appearance to them, as there is rarely a dull moment in either Shaun Of The Dead or Hot Fuzz. Both films have Wright’s signature style of directing, which means that anything can happen at any given moment in one of his films, and when it does, it will carry a frenetic pace and close-up view of it happening. Both films also acknowledge the third premise, which states that any auteur must have an interior meaning in their film. Wright’s films usually dont contain any social message or special meaning. They are often simply just about reckless fun, but both Shaun Of The Dead and Hot Fuzz have a hidden message. Shaun OF The Dead is about maturity, and Hot Fuz is about being able to act a little irresponsibly sometimes and not taking things so seriously. But in order to find these meanings, you have to follow the films to the very end. Since both films apply to the three premises of auteur theory according to Andrew Sarris, Edgar wright can be considered an auteur in his own right.

Spam prevention powered by Akismet

Skip to toolbar